Nzulezu the village on stilts

9th Feb 2021 162 0

Nzulezu is a unique village built on stilts located in  the Western Region of Ghana with a population of about 500 people. A drive to the village on stilts is approximately 7hours journey from Accra .


The most dominant occupation in the village is  farming and fishing . Majority of the kids by the age of 3years are able to swim and paddle a canoe across the river. Prior to arriving at the village on stilts  you need to paddle either a canoe or ride a boat.


A boat  take  about (30mins)boat whilst a canoe(1hour) across the river .You need to pass through the Amansuri  wetland ,a ramsar site and the largest inland swamp forest in Ghana.(that’s actually one of the highlights on the trip because sometimes you actually crocodile moving through the swamp)


It’s believed that the legend of the village is a snail who ensures their safety at all times. The village has no source of electricity but the people in the village have devised  a means of generating their own electricity using car batteries .At night they use recharging lamps, flashlights and lanterns to move about .


Aside Nzulezu , there are other tourist destinations you should check out in the Western Region of Ghana They Include

  • Ankasa forest
  • Fort Apolonia in Beyin
  • The childhood home of Dr Kwame Nkrumah (Late President of the Republic of Ghana)


Best Time To Tour Nzulezu is during  the Month of August and October .you can request for an evening guided tour to see endangered sea turtles


If you’re looking to really experience and explore Nzulezu, the best time to visit is from May 15th to August that’s within the rainy season because you would be privileged to see the moneys and birds chirping .


During the dry season ,you have to walk for approximately 1km as compared to the rainy season where you have to canoe your way throughout the entire journey  until you get to the village .

 

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